The last meals of condemned prisoners

Brent Cunningham has a fascinating write up about last meals in Lapham’s Quarterly.   Consider some of the distancing methods articulated during the execution phase:

The last meal as a cultural phenomenon grew even as capital punishment faded from public view, and in less than two centuries the country has gone from grisly public hangings, in which the prisoner was sometimes unintentionally decapitated or left to suffocate, to lethal injection, the most common form of execution in America today, in which death is “administered.” The condemned are often sedated before execution. They are generally not allowed to listen to music, lest it induce an emotional reaction. Last words are sometimes delivered in writing, rather than spoken; if they are spoken, it might be to prison personnel rather than the witnesses. The detachment is so complete that when scholar Robert Johnson, for his 1998 book Death Work, asked an execution-team officer what his job was, the officer replied: “the right leg.”

via Last Meals – Lapham’s Quarterly.

Good observation that the act of eating the food provided by one’s killer is really a kind of communication to justify the act.

What unites these customs is an emphasis on the needs of the living, not just the dead; so too with last meals before an execution. When Susanna Margarethe Brandt sat down to the Hangman’s Meal, she signaled that she was cooperating in her own death—that she forgave those who judged her and was reconciled to her fate. Whether she actually made those concessions or not is beside the point; the officials who rendered and carried out her sentence could fall asleep that night with a clear conscience.

via Last Meals – Lapham’s Quarterly.

Thanks to Longreads for the suggestion.

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Filed under communication, food, memorial, prisons, propaganda, representation

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