You are dead to me Kanye

35 of Bill Cosby’s accusers sitting for New York Magazine. Photos by Amanda Demme.

I’m done with Kanye West.  To tweet that you think Bill Cosby is innocent after dozens of his victims have come forward is deeply offensive.

1. I know Kanye doesn’t care, but I have been cheering for him for years.  I bought every album.  I defended Kanye after interrupting Taylor Swift.  I reminded people about his painful speech during the Katrina telethon (‘George Bush doesn’t like black people.’)

No more.

No more mashups, no more shout-outs, no more sidebars in my class to discuss Kanye.  No more loud Kanye coming out of my car.  Total and complete boycott.   You are dead to me Kanye West.

2.  Fuck you for not believing black women.  Sure, you could make the case that many African-American male celebrities have experienced racism.  But to chalk up the accusations against Cosby to racism is really disrespectful to the survivors and to all women.   One of the reasons Cosby preyed on women of color was his understanding that they wouldn’t be believed.

“I had a few moments where I tried to come forward. But I was just too scared, and I also had the extra burden of not really wanting to take an African-American man down.” —Jewel Allison

Source: 35 Bill Cosby Accusers Tell Their Stories — The Cut

Boycott Kanye West’s album.  Rape apologists don’t get my money and they shouldn’t get yours.   Sure, I like College Dropout, but not as much as I dislike rape.

3.  Social media plays a role in accountability.  Hold Kanye West accountable.  Remember Cosby’s victims, consider the voice of Tamara Green and hold the feet to the fire of rape apologists.

“People often these days say, ‘Well, why didn’t you take it to the police?’ Andrea Constand went to the police in 2005 — how’d it work out for her? Not at all. In 2005, Bill Cosby still had control of the media. In 2015, we have social media. We can’t be disappeared. It’s online and can never go away.” —Tamara Green

Source: 35 Bill Cosby Accusers Tell Their Stories — The Cut

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Filed under feminism, hip hop, intersectionality, media, representation

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